Pablo Trapero

Pablo Trapero

Director, screenwriter, producer and editor, Pablo Trapero (San Justo, Buenos Aires, 1971) is one of the filmmakers who has practically reinvented the cinema of  his native Argentina and Latin America over the last decades. Along with Bruno Stagnaro and Adrián Caetano’s Pizza, Beer, and Cigarettes, his first feature film, Crane World (1999), laid the corner stone of what is now known as New Argentine Cinema, an a esthetic movement founded by a generation that believed in low budgetfilms with realistic characters and stories tuned into the social issues of the day. Next came El bonaerense (2002), a film about the corrupt police force of the province of Buenos Aires and its rituals, featuring a confused, but endearing main character, which was screened at Cannes in 2002.That same year, Trapero founded Matanza Cine and embarked on a parallel career as a producer, going on to work with directors of the likes of Raúl Perrone, Albertina Carri and Ezequiel Acuña. Rolling Family (2004), a road movie about a large family that travels from Buenos Aires to theprovince of Misiones in a trailer home to attend a wedding, was shown at the Cartagena FilmFestival. By this stage, it was clear Trapero had a gift for exploring new topics, landscapes andcharacters, always from a fresh perspective and with innovative formal solutions. Born and Raised(2006) brings us a successful Buenos Aires publicist who uproots and travels to the south of Argentina in an attempt to come to terms with the death of his daughter, while Lion’s Den (2008), starring Trapero’s wife, the actress and producer Martina Gusmán, depicts the crude reality of aternity behind bars. Carancho (2010) is an exercise in film noir, whose two main characters areplunged into a maelstrom of criminal activities. His last film, White Elephant (2012), once againportrays an institution, this time the church, as always tackling social issues with an incisive,uncompromising camera.Trapero has seven feature and several short films to his credit, a consistent, cohesive body of workthat chronicles modern-day Argentina, not just its contradictions and inequalities, but its energy andvitality. FICCI 55 has chosen to pay tribute to this Argentinean director in recognition of the enormous appeal of his films and his efforts to create conditions conducive to filmmaking. This homage is a celebration of his all-embracing vision in a cut-throat, demanding industry, and his twofoldallegiance: as a filmmaker concerned with the fate of his characters—nearly always social outcasts engaged in a daily battle for survival, but who are not afraid to defend themselves with humor, skepticism and irony—and as a producer who commits to the cinema of others as if it were his own.